cantabricus?

January 14, 2008
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Categories: Daffodil Types, Species

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3 Responses to cantabricus?

  1. January 14, 2008 at 7:37 pm


    Hein,
    Both photos are N. cantabricus. N. romieuxii is a pale yellow flower most that I have seen are a petunioide or somewhat  petunioide in form and all are from North Africa. I consider N. romieuxii as one of the most beautiful of the Bulbocodium section. 
    Marilynn


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  2. Sandra Stewart, Alabama
    January 14, 2008 at 8:37 pm

    I consider N. romieuxii as one of the most beautiful of the Bulbocodium section.
    Marilynn, I totally agree with you about N. romieuxii being so beautiful. I think I lost my pot but maybe it’s just misplaced 😉
    What do they call what I had labelled as N. assoanus now? If there was a prize for being the most fragrant daffodil on the planet, I’d vote for it. I remember having one little stem when I drove with Weldon to the convention in Ashville. My exhibits were almost a total flop at that show as there were hundreds, maybe even thousands of daffodil blooms in there 😉 I think I gave the stem to someone who was enamoured by it. Anyway, that teeny little flower about the size of a No. 2 pencil eraser filled the whole hall with it’s fragrance. That was worth the whole trip for me that night. I felt my mission was complete. So Nancy and I staged a couple of exhibits (which we felt were a great waste of time and they were) and then took the rest of our flower stems and threw them in the garbage can! (We couldn’t give them away) We agree every time we talk that was probably the best feeling in the world we ever got at a daffodil show at the same time!
    Where are these sweet daffodils native in the wild? Are they rare? Where do they naturally grow? Were they mostly gathered up at some time in the past for the perfume industry?
    Just wondering…Sandra

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  3. January 15, 2008 at 5:55 am


    In a message dated 1/14/2008 11:09:31 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, writes:
    Sandra,

    What do they call what I had labeled as N. assoanus now? 

    It is still called N. assoanus.

    If there was a prize for being the most fragrant daffodil on the planet, I’d vote for it. 

    Yes, its fragrance is unmistakable.

    Where are these sweet daffodils native in the wild?  Are they rare?  Where do they naturally grow?  Were they mostly gathered up at some time in the past for the perfume industry? 

    N. assoanus grows in the Pre-Pyrenees of Spain and the South of France. The flowers have been used in the perfume industry.
    Marilynn 

     


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