In trouble here

March 20, 2008
By

Category: General

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I planted my first daff bulbs in January and entered some daffs in the Clinton, Miss state show last weekend, where I got to see a lot of varieties. And while at the show, I had a strange sense that I could not identify at the time, but had first experienced in Ralph Sowell’s daffodil gardens two weeks before. Then yesterday I had the same sense as a few other daffodil varieties opened. And just now I found I had the same sense while looking at photos on Daffseek.
Having some time now to sit back and self-observe my sweet self, I realized that I was elated and breathing hard while looking at daff photos. This is surely not a good sign, is it? Is there individual or collective wisdom out there for dealing with such a reaction? Is this sense the genesis of a full-blown daffodil obsession, and, if so, is it self-treatable, or do I need a 12 step group? “Hello, my name is Jim and I am addicted to uh…um…umm…”
All methods of treatment will be welcomed. I’ve already tried deep breathing and guided imagery with no success. Going for a walk as the daffs are blooming seems to make it worse. 🙂
Jim Chaney Region 8a McComb, Miss.
USA

6 responses to “In trouble here”

  1. Mary Durtschi says:

    Jim,
     
    I think that the best thing you can do for this reaction to daffodils is to plant as many varieties that you can find, as soon as possible.  Make sure that you plant the earliest and latest bloomers that you can find.  There is NO CURE for this disease so the best thing you can do is obtaine the greatest amount of pleasure for the longest time.
     
    This treatment has been wonderful for me and for those around me.  I am strong & supple and a pleasure to be around.  The only down-side is my thin wallet.
     
    Best of luck!
     
    Mary


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  2. Ian Tyler says:

    Dear Jim , From your symptoms you are suffering form “Yellow Fever” the only treatment is more and more daffodils, it is terminal for most! it is highly infectious You will find that it is more prone in spring all sufferers gather one a year at the ADS convention or The Daffodil Society Show here in the UK. Your condition is seasonal and you will start having withdrawal symptoms around May or June, but as you have found they can recur at anytime, just by looking at a picture. Most of us sufferers manage to live with it, but we alleviate the pain by meeting together in groups, where I have noticed that alcohol is taken by many, it does help a bit ! Regards from a fellow sufferer,
    Ian

  3. Loyce McKenzie, Mississippi Loyce McKenzie says:
    Dear Jim,
    What you have, of course, is “yellow fever,” and there is no cure. You might wear out, in thirty or forty years.
    Meanwhile, the best thing for your current symptoms is an intentional overdose.
    Get out your Daffodil Journals, and sign up to go to Richmond to the national convention. You would not believe the sights you will see there, both in the show and on the tours.
    Of course we’ve got to help you learn more about how to build raised beds, to accommodate all the daffodils you want to grow.
    And you need lots of catalogs—look on the ADS websites for all the contact information.
    Loyce McKenzie

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  4. Ted Snazelle, Mississippi Ted Snazelle says:

    Jim: 
    You have “yellow fever,” and there is no cure/treatment other to grow, show, talk, hybridize, photograph, etc. daffodils for the rest of your life!
    Ted

    Theodore E. Snazelle, Ph.D.
    101 Water Oaks Drive
    Clinton MS 39056-9733

    ———

  5. Kathy Welsh says:


    Jim,
    Be aware, large amounts of money will be flowing from your bank account in the near future.  The catalogs should start arriving any day. 
    Kathy


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  6. Jim Chaney says:

    Ian, thank you for the advice to try a bit of liquor with this affliction. Now that I’ve had a few, the wisdom of the group seems very telling, but I need to check in to find if my reaction to treatment is within normal limits. Now when I look at daffodil photos from the shows, my autonomic nervous system becomes aroused, and I still breathe heavily, but I don’t give a damn. Am I on the right track? 🙂
    Jim Chaney Region 8a McComb, Miss USA
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