More historic landscape research questions

April 4, 2008
By

Categories: Daffodil Types, Historics, Species

Download PDF

Hi all,
 
OK, this is for a historic site down near Savannah.
They are looking to re-create an old garden in a few years, and they have a list of 39 bulbs that were grown on the property back in the day (12 are/were daffs).
There are two that I don’t know what they’d be called now.
This list dates 1813-1815.
 
The first is:
 
N. pseudonarcissus (fl.pl.)  [could this be ‘Telamonius Plenus’ -? or would it be something completely different?]
 
and the other is:
 
N. minor (fl. pl.)  [This one I can’t find on the RHS species listing… N. minor seems to have been sold quite a bit way way back when – what would it be called now?]
 
Thanks in advance for any pointers/identifications…
 
-Sara

6 responses to “More historic landscape research questions”

  1. David Liedlich says:

    Sara:

    I believe those are Species Daffodils (Div. 13), none of which are on Daffseek yet.  A variant of Narcissus pseudonarcissus is found by the name Tenby.

    Dave Liedlich

  2. Niels Benatar says:


    N. obvallaris =  Tenby
    a very early bloomer, small blossom and deep yellow in color.  I’ve got 250 of them out in bloom right now.
    Niels


  3. David Liedlich says:

    Neils,

    “obvallaris” is the subspecies name.  It is  N. pseudonarcissus var. obvallaris.  Though according to this article some people consider it a separate species.

    Narcissus pseudonarcissus

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

     (Redirected from Wild Daffodil)
    Jump to: navigation, search
    Narcissus pseudonarcissus

    Scientific classification
    Kingdom: Plantae
    Division: Magnoliophyta
    Class: Liliopsida
    Order: Asparagales
    Family: Amaryllidaceae
    Genus: Narcissus
    Species: N. pseudonarcissus
    Binomial name
    Narcissus pseudonarcissus
    L.

    Narcissus pseudonarcissus (known as the Wild daffodil) is a perennial flowering plant of the family Amaryllidaceae which grows from a bulb. It has pale yellow flowers with a darker central trumpet. The long, narrow leaves are slightly greyish in colour and rise from the base of the stem.

    The species is native to Western Europe from Spain and Portugal east to Germany and north to England and Wales. It is commonly grown in gardens and populations have become established in many other parts of Europe. Wild plants grow in woods, grassland and on rocky ground. In Britain native populations have decreased substantially since the 19th century due to intensification of agriculture, clearance of woodland and uprooting of the bulbs for use in gardens.

    There are a number of subspecies of the wild daffodil but the exact number varies according to different authors. The large number of cultivars adds to the difficulty of classifation. Among the subspecies is the Tenby daffodil (N. p. ssp. obvallaris, sometimes classed as a separate species) which probably originated in cultivation but now grows wild in south-west Wales

  4. Niels Benatar says:


    Dear Dave,
    Thanks for the more detailed information.  Like I said, though, I’m only a very interested and only partially informed novice and I appreciate it when somebody points me in the right direction.
    I have two further questions for you and the forum:
    1.  Topolino seems to look very much like a wild daffodil.  Could you or anyone tell me something about Topolino’s pedigree?  How “close” is it to a wild daffodil?  How was it bred?
    2.  As an absolute novice, I am very much taken by and impressed by gardens that have “that natural look”, knowing full well that that is the trick and the secret involved in a well planned garden.  I would be very interested in receiving tips from the forum or seeing pictures posted in the forum showing how daffodils might best be planted to achieve various effects.  Garden plans could also help.
    Best regards,
    Niels


  5. Joe Hamm says:

    Sara..
    I do not know what the (fl.pl) is after the names you are listing…. is to be flora plenus??
    I remember back in 1989, when I first really starting to do daffodils seriously, I counted 54 different pseudo. narcissus.. since then they have been renamed…. I did not check for a count…

  6. Becky Fox Matthews, Tennessee Becky Fox Matthews says:

    Sara, I purchased N. minor from David Burdick in 2004 and have a small clump of it now. 

    I also wonder what this designation means?   (fl. pl.)

    Becky


    Sara Van Beck wrote:

    " type="cite">

    Hi all,
     
    OK, this is for a historic site down near Savannah.
    They are looking to re-create an old garden in a few years, and they have a list of 39 bulbs that were grown on the property back in the day (12 are/were daffs).
    There are two that I don’t know what they’d be called now.
    This list dates 1813-1815.
     
    The first is:
     
    N. pseudonarcissus (fl.pl.)  [could this be ‘Telamonius Plenus’ -? or would it be something completely different?]
     
    and the other is:
     
    N. minor (fl. pl.)  [This one I can’t find on the RHS species listing… N. minor seems to have been sold quite a bit way way back when – what would it be called now?]
     
    Thanks in advance for any pointers/identifications…
     
    -Sara