HELP!! Flower identification….

January 20, 2009
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Categories: Daffodil Types, Standards

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Hi all –

 

I really need some educated opinions as to what this flower is.

Any/all comments much appreciated.

This is for working with a landscape architect, and I want to make sure that what gets planted back is appropriate…

 

-Sara

4 responses to “HELP!! Flower identification….”

  1. Donna Dietsch says:
    Hi Sara,
    I have been known to be able to identify many daffodils on sight.  The only ones that I confess to being unable to do that with are the 2Y-Y’s.  If you could give us an idea of when this might have been bred, if it would be American or overseas, and if it might be a yellow or possibly even an orange cup it would help. Alternative is to use a different cultivar that you  know instead of this one if you really have to know the name of it.  Is there any reason for this one, like you have lots of it or something like that?
    Donna
  2. Mary Lou Gripshover, Ohio Mary Lou Gripshover says:
    Hi Sara,
    I think your flower looks like a Div. 7, and checking in DaffSeek, the closest I could come to it was ‘Mountjoy’.  Can you tell us any more about age, etc.
    Mary Lou
  3. Keith Kridler says:

    I was going to guess a single headed Trevithian. I thought I saw headstones in the background and with the short mowed lawn I figure that they cut the foliage off well before the plant had time to make enough food to bloom correctly.
     
    If it is close to a headstone you can sometimes get an idea of when the bulbs might have been planted. Subtract about 40 years from the date on the headstone and you have a general idea of when the bulb was being grown commercially.
     
    Trevithian for example was named in the late 1920’s and was popular in the USA in garden centers in the southern states in the late 60’s early 70’s. Keith Kridler

  4. Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland Brian Duncan says:

    All,
    I agree with Keith, Trevithian was one of the first daffodils I planted in the early 1960’s. It was good then – and still is!
    Brian Duncan