spoilers of daffodil blooms

January 9, 2009
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Categories: Diseases and Pests, Snails, Deer and other Pests

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Snails and slugs definitely eat daffodil blooms but here in Tennessee I am beginning to have an epidemic of earwhigs coming out after 11 o’clock to ruin a lot of fresh blooms.  There was a query for a safe way to rid the garden of earwhigs.  Does anyone have a better method than poison and damp newspapers?  They give me the creeps probably because of the old tales.
Nancy Robinson
Maryville, Tennessee
zone 6b  very wet here for the first time in 2 years
 

2 responses to “spoilers of daffodil blooms”

  1. Peter and Lesley Ramsay says:

    Hello All,

     

    We had an epidemic of earwigs in the Waikato last daff season.  We usually don’t see them until late in the season but last year they appeared with the first flowers.  There were large numbers in the patch when we dug the bulbs (just completed thank goodness).  I cannot recall seeing them before at this stage of the year – this does not bode well for our flowering season. 

     

    I do spray the daffs with Decis Forte (A relatively harmless synthetic pyrethrum) and will step this programme up this year.  It  also helps control clover root weevil which also eats flowers.  I have also noted that earwigs  are more liable to attack flowers covered with plastic pots used by many growers in NZ to protect their flowers.  These pots are attached to stakes providing a nice little sanctuary for the pests to hide in before they breakfast on your best bloom.  One trick I have tried with some success is as follows.  Earwigs are lazy beasts and usually attack the flower closest at hand – in the case of blooms  covered by the pots this is the tallest (and inevitably the best) flower – very discerning beasties!  I place a vase of a long stemmed bloom under the pot with my show bloom ABOVE the level of the desired flower.  Lo and behold the lazy earwigs eat the vased flower.  I also regularly spray the inside of my covers with fly spray (also pyrethrum based)  which is an instant kill.  All this takes a lot of time but is worth it if you have a prospective best bloom under cover.

     

    Of course there is a natural control – a COLD< COLD winter.  We are hoping for heavy frosts this year!

     

    Happy New Year to everyone.

     

     

    Peter

     

     

     


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