Loyce McKenzie, Mississippi

Oh, Deer…

February 2, 2009
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Categories: Diseases and Pests, Snails, Deer and other Pests

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Nancy Goodwin, of Montrose Gardens, says the only way she can grow hostas is to ring them with hellebores. Sort of drastic for daffodil borders–you’d get stuck as you pick them.
But it is an idea.
I am watching my new camellia bushes closely every day (glad of an excuse). I haven’t had problems with my other ones, or with these as they waited forlornly in pots to be put into the ground. They don’t seem to like my azaleas, either.
But, oh, they thrive on a diet of privet and daylilies! For me, they can strip the privet to the ground—save me the bother.

Loyce McKenzie,

where we’re two weeks ahead of a normal blooming season.

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2 responses to “Oh, Deer…”

  1. David Liedlich says:

    I have good luck using a systemic deer repellent spray on hostas, apple trees, and daylilies.  Using a systemic spray is important because it gets into the leaves, and does not wash off in the rain.  The particular brand I use is good for about 90 days on the leaves that you have sprayed.  It does not protect new growth, so new foliage needs to be sprayed to be protected.  I usually spray with the deer repellent a few times in the spring, and then in early summer.  By the time the stuff wears out in the fall, I am not too upset when the hostas get eaten in October.

    In addition, I use the deer repellent “Milorganite” fertilizer around the plants that deer love.  This fertilizer by itself offers limited protection, but when coupled with the spray, I have had good luck.

    Dave Liedlich
    Conecticut

  2. David Liedlich says:

    I have good luck using a systemic deer repellent spray on hostas, apple trees, and daylilies.  Using a systemic spray is important because it gets into the leaves, and does not wash off in the rain.  The particular brand I use is good for about 90 days on the leaves that you have sprayed.  It does not protect new growth, so new foliage needs to be sprayed to be protected.  I usually spray with the deer repellent a few times in the spring, and then in early summer.  By the time the stuff wears out in the fall, I am not too upset when the hostas get eaten in October.

    In addition, I use the deer repellent “Milorganite” fertilizer around the plants that deer love.  This fertilizer by itself offers limited protection, but when coupled with the spray, I have had good luck.

    Dave Liedlich
    Conecticut