John McLennan, New Zealand

the name game.

July 14, 2009
By

Categories: Daffodil Types, Standards

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Hi  Daffnetters,
 It,s that quiet , between  season lull on daffnett, a good time to explain and if possible illustrate a few daffodil names.
 
Two that have always intrigued me  are both classic  show flowers that should be in all serious exhibitors collections.
 
Altun  Ha  —  John  Pearson  1987.
An all  time great flower.
I understand its from Johns time in the British  military .  Central  America  .An ancient  ruins.
Is it a current tourist destination or from the  distant past ?
A very different name and I would love to here the full story.
Any word that beats  spell – check  by a mile , must have a tale to tell.
 
 
Gay  Kybo  —  Richardson  —  1980.
Easily the best of the many fine Richardson  doubles.
Daffseek  tells us it is proving to be a useful  parent.
There is no  Kybo  in my dictionary.
 
How the changed meaning of one word  —  GAY  —  can change since  1980
What is  a  —  happy  ,  cheerful  ,carefree and  merry  ,—  KYBO.
 
I,ll sleep  much better  when you  provide the answers.
 
Thanks  John.
 

5 responses to “the name game.”

  1. Tom Stettner, Ohio Tom Stettner says:

    “Altun Ha” Is the name of a Myan Town in Belize. Here’s some description taken from the internet:
    We begin our journey to Altun Ha, Belize by first driving along the Old Northern Highway, we will pass a few small hamlets with their inhabitants eager to smile and wave. The traffic is very light, so we easily take in the surrounding scenery, and stop to spot an occasional deer springing into the bush or even a gibnut or some other furry creature scavenging for food. Our only problem is that the road is more potholes than road, so we hang on tight.
    Flourishing during the Classic Period of Maya civilization, Altun Ha is located 30 miles north of Belize City and about six miles from the Caribbean Sea.
    The true ancient name is unknown and “Altun Ha” is a Mayan translation of the nearby village named “Rockstone Pond.”
    Altun Ha is small compared to other ruins in the region, the extent to which the site has been cleared and restored makes it easy to imagine its past as a major ceremonial center.
    Plaza A is a large grassy area, surrounded on all sides by pyramids and is adjoined by Plaza B which contains the largest structure on the site, the Temple of the Masonry Altars, which rises 54 ft. above the plaza.
    A hike to the top of the Temple of the Masonry Altars is rewarded with a magnificent panorama of the site and over the treetops of the jungle. This temple went through eight phases of construction and the round altar at the top is unique to this site. It was the focus of an unusual sacrificial ceremony in which copal (incense) and beautiful jade carvings were offered into a blazing fire.
    The archaeological site covers about one square mile of area, with at least 500 visible structures and likely had 3000 inhabitants, with a peak population of 8000-10,000 included in the surrounding areas. Evidence dates the earliest settlement here to 200 BC, with varied construction phases ending about 900 AD. Occupation of this site continued for approximately 100 years with a re-occupation occurring the 13th and 14th centuries.
    The most spectacular find here was a six-inch high (15cm), ten pound, jadeite carving of the head of Kinich Ahau, the Sun God, which was found in the tomb of an elderly male priest. It is the largest jade figure found in the Mayan Civilization. This head was found by Dr. David Pendergast and it is now on display at the museum in Belize City. Printed copies of the head can be found on the money of Belize. Because three of the seven priestly tombs in the Temple of the Masonry Altars were plundered, having their contents destroyed and the crypts filled with soil, researchers believe that the final demise of Altun Ha was perhaps brought about by violent peasant revolt.
    There is also a trail running due south from Plaza B which leads you to the main reservoir and onward through Zone E, a residential area, and several small mounds are visible along here. Many burials were recovered in this area, providing vast information about the inhabitants. At the edge of the reservoir is the site of the first temple built at Altun Ha, dating to the Pre-classic Period (100 AD).
    While daily trips to Altun Ha, are standard 1/2 day outing trips by most tour operators; It is also easy to find on your own if you’ve rented a vehicle and there’s news of a small restaurant having opened nearby called Maya Wells. The highlight of our early morning visit was the profusion of birds-namely, more than a dozen Montezuma Oropendolas flying back and forth over the plaza, and a huge flock of Blue Buntings hiding in a fruit tree.
    Entering the site you approach Plaza A, which is enclosed by large temples on all four sides. Here a magnificent tomb was discovered beneath The Temple of the Green Tomb. Dating from 550 AD, this find yielded a total of thee hundred pieces, including jade, jewelry, stingray spines, skin flints and the remains of a Maya Book.
    The Adjacent Plaza B is dominated by the sites largest temple, The Temple of Masonry Altar, which rises 60 feet above the plaza and was the last in a sequence of buildings raised on this spot. This temple was probably the main focus of religious ceremonies, with a single stairway running up the front to an altar at the top.
    Several priestly tombs have been uncovered within the main structure, however most of them had already been desecrated, possibly during political turmoil that preceded the abandonment of the site.
    Just outside these two main plazas, a short nature trail leads to Clay-lined Rockstone Pond, which was damned and used as a reservoir in Maya times,
    Altun Ha was an important trading and religious ceremonial center. Evolution of the temples at Altun Ha continued until about 1,000 AD.
    Even though Altun Ha is small as compared to other ruins in the region, the extent to which the site has been cleared and restored makes it easy to imagine its past glory and wealth as a major ceremonial center.
    Plaza A is a large grassy area, surrounded on all sides by pyramids and is adjoined by Plaza B which contains the largest structure on the site, the Temple of the Masonry Altars, which rises 54 ft. above the plaza.
    A trek to the top of this pyramid is rewarded with a magnificent panorama of the site and over the treetops of the jungle. This temple went through eight phases of construction and the round altar at the top is unique to this site. It was the focus of an unusual sacrificial ceremony in which copal (incense) and beautiful jade carvings were offered into a blazing fire.
    I think that will explain this one..
    I’ll let someone else explain Gay Kybo, but Becky has it correct. It’s a funny story.
    Tom

  2. Marilyn Howe says:


    Hi John and all,
    ‘Gay Kybo’ was the name of a racehouse.
    Marilynn
    In a message dated 7/14/2009 3:23:55 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,  title= writes:

    Gay  Kybo  —  Richardson  —  1980.
    Easily the best of the many fine Richardson  doubles.
    Daffseek  tells us it is proving to be a useful  parent.
    There is no  Kybo  in my dictionary.
     
    How the changed meaning of one word  —  GAY  —  can change since  1980
    What is  a  —  happy  ,  cheerful  ,carefree and  merry  ,—  KYBO.
     

  3. Denis Dailey says:

    My very English grandfather gave me advise when I was shipped off to boarding school at 13. “Avoid constipation. It affects the mind so keep your bowels open.” (K eep Y our B owels O pen) How KYBO got attached to the flower I have no idea but I suspect Richardson must have had a great sense of humor. Denis Dailey

  4. Marilyn Howe says:


    Hi Dennis and all,
    When I visited China with Marie Bozievich many years ago, our Chinese Guide referred to the restrooms as the Happy Room. We asked why that name? He replied that when everyone comes out they have a smile on their face!
    Marilynn
    In a message dated 7/14/2009 10:08:30 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,  title= writes:

    My very English grandfather gave me advise when I was shipped off to
    boarding school at 13. “Avoid constipation. It affects the mind so
    keep your bowels open.” (K eep  Y our  B owels O pen) How KYBO got
    attached to the flower I have no idea but I suspect Richardson must
    have had a great sense of humor.
    Denis Dailey

  5. Phyllis Hess says:

    LOL and a racehouse could be the outhouse you race too, sorry Marilynn I just couldn’t resist.
    Phyllis