Fw: SIMPLE STEPS FOR DRYING FLOWERS

August 5, 2009
By

Category: General

Download PDF

SIMPLE STEPS FOR DRYING FLOWERS

< ![endif]-->

This is information sent to me by Virginia Guild. 
 
She has made wonderful arrangements for The State Department here in Washington, D.C. for years.  The flowers are all dried and the arrangements are stunning. 
 
Judge Quinn also has information in his daffodil book about drying daffodils which is similar. 
 
Chriss
 
 

SIMPLE STEPS FOR DRYING FLOWERS

 

SUPPLIES YOU WILL NEED:

Silica Gel (“Flower-Dri”)

Washed White Play Sand

Florist Wire – 20 and 24 gauge

Airtight storage boxes or tins

Long nose pliers with wire cutter

 

GATHERING FLOWERS:

Flowers should be cut when they are at their peak of perfection. They

must be completely dry before being covered. Never pick after a rain or heavy dew.

They are best covered as soon as they are picked, therefore cut only as many as you have time or space to process. If you are not able to cover them immediately place them in water to condition.

 

COVERING:

 Remove all but approximately one inch of the stem and insert florist wire into the remaining stem up into the calyx, leaving about two inches of wire protruding from the stem.

Place an inch or two of silica gel in the bottom of your airtight storage container.

Turn wire at right angle to the bloom and set bloom in container.

Place silica gel in a small plastic cup or can and begin to let it sift very slowly and gently around and under.

On double flowers work the gel between the petals separating them gently with your fingers.  In the case of up-shaped blooms such as tulips, lilies, etc., start building up around the outside of the flower, then put some of the medium inside, keeping even pressure on both sides so bloom will not splay or collapse.  Continue covering until all blooms are completely covered.

 

More than one flower may be put in the container as long as they do not touch, but do not mix different kinds of flowers as drying time will vary.

 

Flowers such as larkspur with florets along stem should be dried in a horizontal position in a long box.  Surround and cover stems, lifting florets from tip ends to bottom flowers to avoid flattening.

 

Seal box tightly and place in a warm, dry place. Drying time varies greatly.  Most flowers will dehydrate in silica gel in 4 to 7 days.  Make sure each container is labeled with the date and type of flower.

 

Flowers may also be dried using fine white play sand.  Follow the above method for covering blooms.  Boxes do not have to be covered and sealed but should be left open and placed in a warm dry place.  Drying time in sand will take a longer time and colors may not be as vivid as when dried in silica gel.

 

REMOVING FLOWERS FROM DRYING MEDIUM:

This must also be done very carefully.  Hold back each flower as you pour off the drying medium.  To remove excess silica gel particles from tiny crevices you may gently pour sand over the petals. This will “blast” away any unwanted residue.

 

STORING DRIED FLOWERS:

Use an airtight container such as Tupperware, cookie tins, or shallow boxes sealed inside plastic bags.  Flowers can be separated with foam peanuts, and an open cup of silica gel placed in the storage box as extra insurance against humidity.

 

ARRANGING DRIED FLOWERS:

Dried flowers do not tolerate humidity so when you are sure humidity is low (in your house and outside) remove the flowers. Construct longer stems from wire and floral tape. Use dry floral foam and your own creativity to make your arrangement.  Enjoy!!!

 

I am using the Free version of SPAMfighter.
We are a community of 6 million users fighting spam.
SPAMfighter has removed 168 of my spam emails to date.
The Professional version does not have this message.

Comments are closed.