Kirby Fong, California

2016 Murphys Show – Miniature Collection Awards

March 22, 2016
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Categories: Show Results, Shows

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Here are the miniature collection ADS award winners.

Lavender Ribbon Winner

Lavender Ribbon Winner

The Lavender Ribbon is for the best collection of 5 miniatures. Exhibitor of the winning collection was Kirby Fong. The flowers are: Keira KB-M-BH-41-14 10Y-Y, ‘Suzy Q’ 10Y-Y, ‘Tiny Bubbles’ 12Y-Y, Trevanion 05/116B 10Y-Y, Keira KB-BH-10Y-Y-13 10Y-Y.

Bankhead Ribbon Winner

Bankhead Ribbon Winner

The Bankhead Ribbon is for the best collection of 9 miniature daffodils from at least 3 different RHS divisions. Exhibitor of the winning collection was Jon Kawaguchi. The flowers are:
Back row: N. jonquilla 13Y-Y, ‘Leota Mill’ 2Y-YOO, ‘Baby Boomer’ 7Y-Y, ‘Hawera’ 5Y-Y, ‘Marilynn Howe’ 7W-P;
Front row: ‘Connie No. 1’ 10Y-Y, ‘Fairy Chimes’ 5Y-Y, ‘Tête-à-Tête’ 12Y-O, ‘Zinkowski Group’ 10Y-Y.

Watrous Award Winner

Watrous Award Winner

The Watrous Award is for the best collection of 12 miniature daffodils from at least 3 RHS divisions. Exhibitor of the winning collection was Jon Kawaguchi. The flowers are:
Back row: ‘Hawera’ 5Y-Y, Vinisky V-01-65 5Y-Y, ‘Baby Boomer’ 7Y-Y, JBK 06-111-01 7Y-Y (N. jonquilla x N. cordubensis), N. fernandesii 13Y-Y;
Middle row: ‘Clay’s Gold’ 10Y-Y, JBK 09-24-02 10Y-Y (N. bulb. var. conspicuus x N. bulb. var. citrinus), ‘Romantique’ 5Y-Y, JBK 06-339-01 10Y-Y (‘Apollo Gold’ x ‘Oregon Petticoat Group’);
Front row: ‘Connie No. 1’ 10Y-Y, N. bulb. var. viriditubus MS142 13Y-Y, JBK 10-15-01 10Y-Y (N. obesus MF545 x (N. bulb. x ‘Parasol’)).

Premier Miniature Collection Ribbon Winner

Premier Miniature Collection Ribbon Winner

The Premier Miniature Collection Ribbon is for the best collection of 24 miniature daffodils from at least 5 RHS divisions. Exhibitors of the winning collection were Harold Koopowitz and Marilynn Howe. Note the variety of forms and colors in this exhibit compared to the most readily available miniatures which are most just yellow or white. The flowers are:
Back row: 2006-086-7 7YYW-W, 2008-088-1 11aY-R, 2007-0909-2 11aW-W, X-49-5 11aY-Y, 2009-103-3 8W-WWP, 2008-078-1 2Y-R;
3rd row: 2011-017-2 4Y-Y, 2006-036-8 5W-W, 2009-009-1 11aY-Y, ‘Little Karen’ 8W-P, 2009-025-1 2Y-O, 2008-005-1 4W-W;
2nd row: 2009-072-9 8W-YOO, 2009-071-1 2Y-O, ‘Martha Cash’ 8W-P, 2012-056-1 5Y-Y, ‘Puppy Love’ 2W-P, ‘Itsy Bitsy Splitsy’ 11aY-O;
Front row: 2012-056-6 5Y-Y, 2011-145-1 8W-W, 2009-025-1 6Y-Y, 2003-036-6 8W-W, 2013-006-1 10Y-Y, 2007-090-1 11aW-W.

6 Miniatures by Hybridizer Ribbon Winner

6 Miniatures by Hybridizer Ribbon Winner

In the miniature hybridizers classes, the exhibitor must be the hybridizer and the originator of the miniature cultivars. Exhibitors of the winning exhibit of 6 were Harold Koopowitz and Marilynn Howe. The flowers are:
Back row: ‘Itsy Bitsy Splitsy’ 11aY-O, 2012-085-7 7Y-W, 2009-032-1 7Y-O;
Front row: ‘Martha Cash’ 8W-P, ‘Xica’ 11aY-Y, 2003-036-11 8W-P.

12 Miniatures by Hybridizer Ribbon Winner

12 Miniatures by Hybridizer Ribbon Winner

Here’s the winning exhibit of 12 miniatures exhibited by its hybridizer and originator. The exhibitors were Harold Koopowitz and Marilynn Howe. The flowers are:
Back row: 03-036-21 8W-P, ‘Xica’ 11aY-Y, 03-036-14 8W-W, 2011-043-6 2Y-Y;
Middle row: 2009-078-11 2Y-O, 2010-049-4 11aW-Y, 1999-076-5 11aY-R, ‘Martha Cash’ 8W-P;
Front row: 2003-036-1 8W-P, 2009-059-1 11aY-Y, 03-036-C 2W-P, ‘Itsy Bitsy Splitsy’ 11aY-O.

And this completes the postings of the ADS award winners at the 2016 Murphys, California daffodil show.

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8 Responses to 2016 Murphys Show – Miniature Collection Awards

  1. Mary Lou Gripshover, Ohio
    Mary Lou Gripshover, Ohio
    March 22, 2016 at 1:55 pm

    Congratulations to all the winners!  Beautiful flowers.  And thank you, Kirby, for posting photos of them all.

  2. Suzy Wert, Indiana
    March 25, 2016 at 6:29 pm

    It’s interesting to me that so many Div 5s are represented in miniatures in the California shows, but the show schedules hardly mention Div 5 in standard classes. I thought there was only usually one class in California shows, whereas in the Midwest there are usually four or more. I was told it was because the ttriandrus bloom so late when it gets hot and they don’t persist. Why are the mini triandrus so well represented? And could the same parents, in larger versions, be used to create more and varied standard triandrus hybrids there? I’m thinking it could benefit us all because not all triandrus grow well here, though we don’t have the extreme heat, we do have the combination of heat + rain.

    Suzy

  3. Graham Fleming, Australia
    Graham Fleming, Australia
    March 27, 2016 at 4:09 am

    Suzy
    While we are best known for hybridising miniatures we have done a lot of hybridising of standard triandus hybrids that survive better in our hot conditions. While our hot conditions are not quite as severe as those in some parts of California it will be interesting to see how they go there and for that matter in your cold conditions. We have quite a few different forms of the species and while most forms flower in mid to late season we have a couple of miniature forms that flower in early season. In mid to late season we have some quite large forms that flower and we hope that they will assist us to develop larger forms.
    The species subsist in our hot and dry conditions but some of the conditions in California are probably too hot for the species to subsist. The hybrids tend to be hardier.
    Harold has some wonderful coloured hybrids. We have a lot of miniature colour but most are in different classes to Harold. At our local Canberra Show Lawrence Trevanion and Keira Bulbs compete in the miniature classes and you need a lot of colour these days to win. Yellow and white are simply not good enough and the flowers have to be very small. Rod Barwick of Glenbrook Bulb Farm also has colour in quite a few of his miniatures.
    The flowers exist but availability is another matter altogether and that goes not just for miniatures but for standard Division 5’s.
    Graham Fleming
    Keira Bulbs

  4. Clay Higgins, North Carolina
    Clay Higgins, North Carolina
    March 27, 2016 at 4:09 pm

    Harold,

    Wonderful selections.

    I have a question about Itsy Bitsy Splitsy.  Is it supposed to have two heads or is the standard one head.  I noticed some judges seem to like the single head over the double head, but it looks like in the pictures above that there are single and double heads (not in the same class) for Itsy Bitsy Splitsy.

     

    Clay

  5. Harold Koopowitz, California
    Harold Koopowitz, California
    March 28, 2016 at 10:25 am

    Clay:

    Itsy Bitsy can make two flowers on a large mother bulb and very rarely even three. Most stems normally only make one flower. I think I prefer the single flowered stems.

    Harold

  6. David Adams, New Zealand
    March 29, 2016 at 1:47 am

    I was taught that N triandrus triandrus was rather fragile and could only be kept going by seed. My experience would confirm this. Therefore it stands to reason that hybrids may also be difficult to keep, often flowering once then disappearing. Those crossed with jonquils seem more robust.
    Your response please Harold.

  7. Harold Koopowitz, California
    Harold Koopowitz, California
    March 29, 2016 at 8:10 am

    I think a lot also depends on the other parent. Fertile jonquilla hybrids with triandrus are usually robust but I find that most triandrus hybrids do not make many offsets. Thalia is an exception. Remember that triandrus itself hardly ever makes significant offsets; in the wild triandrus bulbs usually have single noses.

  8. Clay Higgins, North Carolina
    Clay Higgins, North Carolina
    April 2, 2016 at 2:42 pm

    Harold,

    That’s interesting about Itsy Bitsy Splitsy.  Most all of mine this year had two or three heads. (I had bought 1 bulb the last two years and they have multiplied well after being planted in two different locations.)  I have six bulbs now.  I don’t do anything for them, no exotic soil, but plain sand soil with a small amount of amendment.  How do you keep them so they only have one head.

    On the Triandrus hybrids, I find that some multiply by bulb division, and some don’t.  The Triandrus X N. cordubensis miniatures seems to multiply by bulb division for me on some and on others it does not.  I have three that do and several more including those that I got from Graham Fleming that do not.

    Secondly, I planted three N. Triandrus (the white kind with one blum) several years (2007) ago under a pine tree in my back year and just left them there.  It’s usually dry and hot summers here.  This year there were 6 N. Triandrus that bloomed under that tree.  I think I have naturalized them. I take pollen from it but I don’t disturb the ground or try to pollinate the bloom.

     

    Clay