Theo Sanders, Germany

Seedling ‘Gloriosus x N.elegans’

October 8, 2018
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Categories: Autumn Blooming Daffodils, Daffodil Types, Hybridizing, Seedling

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My first seedling from the cross ‘Gloriosus x N. elegans’ is flowering after four years.

Theo

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13 Responses to Seedling ‘Gloriosus x N.elegans’

  1. Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland
    Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland
    October 8, 2018 at 3:19 am

    Congratulations Theo. You’ve got great colour and form. What size is the flower? Might it be fertile?

    Brian

  2. Mary Lou Gripshover, Ohio
    Mary Lou Gripshover, Ohio
    October 8, 2018 at 5:58 am

    Very nice, Theo!

  3. Harold Koopowitz, California
    Harold Koopowitz, California
    October 8, 2018 at 8:02 am

    Brian:

    I made the cross some years ago and yes they are all fertile.

    Harold

  4. Harold Koopowitz, California
    Harold Koopowitz, California
    October 8, 2018 at 8:13 am

    Brian:

    Same cross – I made it years ago. Photo from last year all the flowers split for pollination with frozen standard spring flowering pinks. Harvested over 100 seeds. Should be germinating soon, I hope.

    Harold

  5. Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland
    Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland
    October 8, 2018 at 10:04 am

    Harold,

    Thanks for that good news. Have you named any seedlings – and have you any for sale?

    Have you tried crossing them with N. dubius or N. rupicola subsp. watieri ?

    Brian

  6. Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland
    Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland
    October 8, 2018 at 10:08 am

    Harold,

    You should have some interesting results in 3-4 years. I hope I can see them.

    Brian

  7. Theo Sanders, Germany
    Theo Sanders, Germany
    October 9, 2018 at 12:37 am

    Brian and Harold,

    The diameter of the flower is 30 mm, the height of the stem 160 mm. The plant is diploid and should behave concerning crosses like Gloriosus, N. tazetta, and diploid Y-O tazettas. That means in my experience: Crosses with standard daffodils as seed parents as well as crosses with N. dubius and N. rupicola subspecies watieri should be possible.

    In spring I shall install a cabin within my greenhouse to cross there standard daffodils with different tazettas at a temperatur of 20 degrees C.

    Theo

  8. Spud Brogden, New Zealand
    October 9, 2018 at 1:50 pm

    Lovely corona shape and colour.

    Spud Brogden
    Normanby, NZ

  9. Bradley McCarson, South Carolina
    Bradley McCarson, South Carolina
    October 9, 2018 at 3:39 pm

    Incredibly beautiful cross.

    Last season I successfully crossed several Autumn colors tazettas with standard daffodils. Some successful crosses were tetraploid Newton with St.Keverne, AC x psuedonarcissus and AC x dutch master. I have the seeds germinating now and hope they sprout soon.

    I have saved frozen pollen from standard daffodils and I’m crossing these with viridiflorus, serotinus, and AC at the moment. I have several goals in mind and hope to be able to share and contribute more to the daffodil world soon.

  10. Harold Koopowitz, California
    Harold Koopowitz, California
    October 9, 2018 at 5:45 pm

    Here are the crosses I made and seed harvested. Note I use N. obsoletus as the correct name for N. elegans. Our paper on the name change was accepted and published in Phytotaxa.

    2018-010 (Gloriosum x obsoletus) x ‘Ruby Duby’ = 23 seeds.

    2018-017 (Gloriosum x obsoletus) x obsoletus ‘select form’ = 36 seeds

    2018-018 (Gloriosum x obsoletus) x ‘Luvit’ = 55 seeds

    2018-2030 (Gloriosum x obsoletus) x ‘Pink Quest’ = 41 seeds

    I should know about germination in another 6 weeks or so. I need to thank Graham Phillips for providing the pollen of intense division 2 pink cups, for me.

    Harold

  11. Bradley McCarson, South Carolina
    Bradley McCarson, South Carolina
    October 9, 2018 at 7:03 pm

    Harold, how come you did not de-anther the florets?

  12. Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland
    Brian Duncan, Northern Ireland
    October 10, 2018 at 2:11 am

    Harold,

    Very interesting crosses and I hope you find some exciting seedlings. It’s good to find such fertile seedlings to work with –

    and if the progeny are fertile then the possibilities are great for the future.

    I am sorry that you insist on changing the name of N. elegans, I know you have been persuasive in having this published

    but that does not make it right – and I know some other authorities are not in agreement with your view. Likewise, I am not in

    favour with your name of N. miniatus for what was known many years ago as either N. obsoletus or N. deficiens – the debate

    should be about which of these has most validity rather than create a new name. I know we will never agree on these points.

    Brian

  13. Harold Koopowitz, California
    Harold Koopowitz, California
    October 10, 2018 at 8:01 pm

    Brian:

    We will have to simply agree to disagree. This, however, does not affect my profound respect for your contributions to the daffodil world.

    best wishes

    Harold