Suicide Daffodils! – And Dogs

December 31, 2010
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Categories: Bulb Information, Daffodil Types, Growing Daffodils, Standards

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About 30 years ago my sheltie puppy ate a couple of daffodil bulbs I had dug and hadn’t yet replanted.  I rushed her to the vet, and following are the notes I wrote down in my sheltie book from that day:
Narcissus bulbs = toxic (emetic action).  Induce vomiting unless dog vomits on her own. Then give 1 oz (for a 15 pound dog) Kaopectate every 2 hours. Watch closely for 12 hours for nausea, diarrhea, trembling, convulsions, abdominal pain, coma.  Mild symptoms may occur for 24 hours after ingestion. Symptoms begin about 1 hour after ingestion.  This is for bulbs dug at home and not treated with any fungicide. Commercial bulbs which may have been treated with a fungicide are a different problem and the grower should be contacted to see what fungicide was used so that can be taken into account.
Lina Burton
In a message dated 12/31/2010 5:11:03 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  title= writes:

but someone asked a about animal deaths from eating daffodils and it seems it is not an uncommon occurrence with our bovine friends!


One response to “Suicide Daffodils! – And Dogs”

  1. Denis Dailey says:
    .

    It is my understanding that daffodils (the entire plant) contain significant amounts of oxalates which when tasted, give the sensation to the tongue, of fish hooks being inserted in it. There is a web site listing some of the plants with high concentrations of oxalates which apparently are sufficiently ingested to alert Mds to this problem.

    http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/817016-overview

    Daffodils are not on this list but neither is parsley. Parsley is among a small number of foods that contain measurable amounts of oxalates, naturally-occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. When oxalates become too concentrated in body fluids, they can crystallize and cause health problems. For this reason, individuals with already existing and untreated kidney or gallbladder problems may want to avoid eating parsley. Laboratory studies have shown that oxalates may also interfere with absorption of calcium from the body.

    Have you ever eaten out and wondered how many times a sprig of parsley has been returned to the kitchen, rinsed off and served again? It is for these reasons the SPPPPPPP exists. (Society for the Prevention of Putting Parsley on Peoples Plates in Public Places) Contact me about joining.

    Happy New Year. Denis Dailey-

     
    On Fri, Dec 31, 2010 at 9:41 AM, < title=> wrote:

    About 30 years ago my sheltie puppy ate a couple of daffodil bulbs I had dug and hadn't yet replanted.  I rushed her to the vet, and following are the notes I wrote down in my sheltie book from that day:
     
    Narcissus bulbs = toxic (emetic action).  Induce vomiting unless dog vomits on her own. Then give 1 oz (for a 15 pound dog) Kaopectate every 2 hours. Watch closely for 12 hours for nausea, diarrhea, trembling, convulsions, abdominal pain, coma.  Mild symptoms may occur for 24 hours after ingestion. Symptoms begin about 1 hour after ingestion.  This is for bulbs dug at home and not treated with any fungicide. Commercial bulbs which may have been treated with a fungicide are a different problem and the grower should be contacted to see what fungicide was used so that can be taken into account.
     
    Lina Burton
     
     
    In a message dated 12/31/2010 5:11:03 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,  title= writes:

    but someone asked a about animal deaths from eating daffodils and it seems it is not an uncommon occurrence with our bovine friends!