Marking advice?

April 7, 2008
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Categories: Growing Daffodils, Planting

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Marking advice?

Any advice on how to mark a clump of daffodils to dig?  I have some single clumps and some large areas that need to be dug up this year.  I want to wait until June or July to dig.  What works for marking areas and/or single clumps?  I’ve nailed flagging tape to the ground or tied it to clumps in the past and wouldn’t recommend it.

Thanks,

Kathleen Simpson

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4 Responses to Marking advice?

  1. Sandra Stewart, Alabama
    April 7, 2008 at 3:39 pm

    Kathleen
    I get those orange flags that utilities use and just stick one in the clump. You can write the name on it if you need too??? I got mine at a local industrial supply store – very inexpensive.
    Sandra —- “Simpson wrote: Any advice on how to mark a clump of daffodils to dig? I have some single clumps and some large areas that need to be dug up this year. I want to wait until June or July to dig. What works for marking areas and/or single clumps? I’ve nailed flagging tape to the ground or tied it to clumps in the past and wouldn’t recommend it.
    Thanks, Kathleen Simpson

  2. Bill Lee, Ohio
    April 7, 2008 at 6:38 pm

    In a message dated 4/7/2008 5:47:32 PM Eastern Standard Time,  title= writes:

    Any advice on how to mark a clump of daffodils to dig?  I have some single clumps and some large areas that need to be dug up this year.  I want to wait until June or July to dig.  What works for marking areas and/or single clumps?  I’ve nailed flagging tape to the ground or tied it to clumps in the past and wouldn’t recommend it.

    Kathleen, I know people who have used that colored gravel used in aquariums to mark the spots they want to dig. If you want to also indicate a name, go to a farm supply and get some of those agricultural flags that consist of a piece of colored plastic attached to the top of a 2-3 foot heavy piece of wire to push into the soil there too. You can write on these with Sharpies.
    Bill Lee

  3. April 7, 2008 at 6:52 pm
    Gempler’s  http://www.gemplers.com/ is a good source for a wde variety of those flags of different heights, colors and materials.  If you live in an area with much of a groundhog population, I’d suggest not using the sort with plastic stakes, nor using metal or fiberglass ones that are shorter — you’ll find the plastic stakes chewed up or the flags ripped off.  (Learned first hand).
    Drew Mc Farland
    Granville, Ohio
  4. John Beck, Illinois
    April 8, 2008 at 8:29 am

    Oh

    I thought you were liberating them from the neighbor’s yard-
    which can get you arrested for the first 14 days- then they are “expired”
    (at least in Illinois) and are to be removed until more digging is scheduled