NZ Champion Bloom

September 10, 2008
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Categories: Judging, Shows

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Thanks Bill
You prove my point, You are experienced enough to register anything you might find or breed.
The small grower with his unnamed bloom would not know how to do this but you are not prepared to let him or her to take his chance against you.It would not be right for someone who found a good Bloom in his garden to beat you would it
Ivor Clark

3 responses to “NZ Champion Bloom”

  1. Mary Lou Gripshover, Ohio Mary Lou Gripshover says:

    No, Ivor, you have it wrong.  We try to help small growers who come to our shows identify their flowers if we can.  Locally, we have a class for unknown flowers, but flowers there are not eligible for ADS awards.  Our schedule says flowers must be identified by name and classification, so an un-named bloom would be NAS.  I’m sure you have flowers that are not judged because they are NAS.  (The same is true of a mis-named flower.)  It has nothing to do with having an un-named flower beating anyone. These are the rules we play by.  Shows are an educational venue for the public.  If they see a flower they like, they can write down the name and then hopefully find a source that sells it.  Hard to do that if the bloom is unknown.
    Mary Lou

  2. Bill Lee says:


    In a message dated 9/10/2008 11:14:53 AM Eastern Standard Time,  title= writes:

    You prove my point, You are experienced enough to register anything you might find or breed.
    The small grower with his unnamed bloom would not know how to do this but you are not prepared to let him or her to take his chance against you.It would not be right for someone who found a good Bloom in his garden to beat you would it

    You missed the whole point, Ivor. Is it unnamed because the exhibitor has forgotten, never known, or misplaced the name? If it is a named daffodil and you just don’t know the name, no, you can’t compete for ADS awards with that one. It’s not a new daffodil and it isn’t yours to name.
    If it is unnamed because it is truly a sport or a hybrid resulting either from nature or your own hybridizing, well that’s a different kind of unnamed daffodil. That is one that is yours to exhibit and compete with against all the known named daffodils if you just give it a name or use a seedling number.
    Nobody I have ever seen in an American daffodil show wants to discourage the newcomer. If someone new arrives with a fistful of daffodils, we try our darndest to give then  known names. But if we can’t come up with one, it has to go into the Unnamed category and not compete for ADS awards. Those are the rules.
    And you might want to consider why these are the rules. If this unnamed daffodil is a rare beauty that can win big awards against all the known named daffodils, then it needs some identification so that others can acquire it, whether it be a seedling number or a new name that is ultimately to be registered and hopefully distributed to others.
    Frankly, in most of our American home gardens, sports and spontaneous seedlings are just not that common in my experience.
    Bill Lee

  3. Bob Spotts says:


    Ivor,

    Please don’t lay blame on Bill Lee. Daffodil shows in the USA are sanctioned by the American Daffodil Society. Under ADS regulations, un-named daffodils are not eligible for show awards.

    This rule serves the purpose of encouraging exhibitors to keep track of the names of their daffodils. That way, when a show visitor sees a bloom s/he covets, the name of the variety is there for her/him.

     Bob

    At 09:13 AM 9/10/2008, you wrote:

    Thanks Bill
    You prove my point, You are experienced enough to register anything you might find or breed.
    The small grower with his unnamed bloom would not know how to do this but you are not prepared to let him or her to take his chance against you.It would not be right for someone who found a good Bloom in his garden to beat you would it
    Ivor Clark